Sunday, February 14, 2010

UB's 'Naturopathy and Acupuncture are Science' Claim – Clinic Pamphlets 2010:


here, I cite from 2 current pamphlets the University of Bridgeport [UB] uses to advertise for paying patients for their naturopathy clinic [see 001., below] and acupuncture clinic [see 002., below]; then, I quote from sources quite in disagreement [see 003., below]: 

001. UB writes in the pamphlet “Naturopathic Medical Clinic”:

“the University of Bridgeport Health Science Center.  Quality and affordable healthcare.  Naturopathic medical clinic […] Health Sciences Center, 60 Lafayette Street, Bridgeport, CT 06604.”

Here's a glimpse:
.
Note: apparently, quality is the same thing as absurdity, wherein a University takes your money under the label of science, when truly the domain in question's essential premises are science-ejected.  Fascinating 'junk thought'.

002. UB also writes in “Acupuncture Clinic”:

“the University of Bridgeport Health Science Center.  Quality and affordable healthcare.   Acupuncture clinic […] acupuncture is a health science […] Health Sciences Center, 60 Lafayette Street, Bridgeport, CT 06604.”

Here's a glimpse:
.
003. my favorite antidote quotes to the above [false] claims:

003.a. regarding naturopathy, there is the Center for Inquiry's Richard Hull who states: 

"naturopathy is a fraudulent approach to medical causation, depending on the hypothetical 'life force' that supposedly guides healing. No life force has ever been detected, nor has any other supernatural force or being."

Note: here is UB's requisite vitalism and supernaturalism.

003.b. regarding acupuncture, there is Science-Based Medicine's Ben Kavoussi who writes::

"as long as Chinese metaphysics and vitalism are perceived as anything but pre-scientific and disproved worldviews, pseudo-doctors and purveyors of TCM woo-woo will continue to provide the community of believers with medical astrology, alchemy, humoral pathology and even dialogue with the dead, heal with incantations, crystals, colors or sounds, remotely or via touch, and make implausible medical claims –- all with the full blessing and endorsement of the CA Department of Consumer Affairs."

Note: I include CT in that list of endorsers of sCAM, both in terms of the general consumer and the education consumer.
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